Tag Archives: Takeshita Dori

Exploring Tokyo

May 29, 2017

We wake up early in the morning (7 AM) to kickoff our first full day in Tokyo. Before venturing out, we stop by the front desk at the hotel to get a map of the metro. Turns out there are multiple companies that operate railways within the city of Tokyo. There is the JR Line, the more popular train service among tourists since it offers 7, 14, or 21 day passes for unlimited travel within Japan. The JR railway network is great for travel between cities in Japan but the train stations for local travel within Tokyo are quite spread out. Then there is the Tokyo Metro subway which is operated by a different company that offers great connectivity within Tokyo. The Metro network has a lot more lines and stops within the city of Tokyo. There are also other companies that operate other railway lines such as Toei line and Obakyu line. Having finally learned at a high level about the train system in Tokyo, we decide to go with the Tokyo Metro day pass, especially since we did not buy the JR Rail pass and were not bound by it.

First, we head out to the Tokyo Metropolitan building to catch a view of the Tokyo sky line. The Tokyo metropolitan building allows visitors to view the Tokyo from above for free which explains why we see many tourists and also locals. We see a view that apparently on a very clear day you are able to see the infamous mount Fuji. We however are not lucky enough to catch a glimpse but we do see an example which outlines where we would see it.

Tokyo Metropolitan
View from Tokyo Metropolitan Building

After the Tokyo Metropolitan building we head over to the Meiji Shrine. However a few wrong turns and a long walk around Yoyogi park, we arrive at Takeshita Dori which is the heart of Harajuku and a destination we were planning to see at a later time. We decide to explore this street before seeing the Meiji shrine. The street is crowded and we see several groups of girls. There are many lines formed outside of various shops of unique/specialty food items. We see fancy crepe shops and the line for rainbow cotton candy shop contains atleast 20+ people. We aren’t able to see any Harajuku girls but we do see several shops selling costumes they would typically wear. Side note: Harajuku girls are backup dancer that were first featured in stage shows and music videos for Gwen Stefani. These girls can often be seen in the Harajuku district wearing costumes. In addition to many confectionary shops we also note that most streets are equipped with vending machines selling snacks, coffee, beer and even liquor. In general, we notice that you can find vending machines on every street of Japan (and that is not an exaggeration!!).

We finally make our way over to the Yoyogi park along a shaded path leading to the Meiji Shrine. Unfortunately the shrine is under construction so we are not able to see it in its full glory.

We next head over to the Shibuya crossing which is one of the busiest crossings in the world. Here, over 6 different pedestrian crossings merge which gives us an idea of just how populated Tokyo really is. It is estimated that over 2500 pedestrians cross the crossing every time the signal changes. I do want to stop for a second to comment on how efficient the city is despite its population. Even on the escalators, people line up on the left side to allow other passengers to walk up on the right side. The streets are impeccably clean despite no visible trash cans in site. After marveling at the Shibuya crossing and even getting a distant view from the Shibuya station, we make our way over to  Nagi Shokudo, a vegan restaurant (after a great deal of searching). We take our shoes off and enjoy a vegan meal Japanese style. We try this delicious plum sake that tasted like sweet plum juice. After resting our feet and having refueled, we head over to the Akihabara electronic district. This is where locals and visitors come to buy “cheap” Japanese electronics. I say cheap in quotations because prices seemed similar if not pricier than what we find in the states. Regardless, it was still an experience to see all the variety offered here. The Yodobashi Akiba Store contained 9 floors of electronics. We only made it to the first three floors but I start to see that people likely come to these stores for the variety they offer. For example, there were 10+ lanes of iPhone 7 cases, several lanes of cannon cameras and lens, etc.

Next, we hop on the metro and head over to the Kaminarimon gate which houses a 220 pound Japanese lantern which also is the gateway to the Nakamise street.

Here we try iced green tea which is incredibly refreshing after having walked over 5 miles. We also try this spicy rice cracker which went along great with our cold beverage.

We walk along browsing shops of souvenirs and make our way over to the Hozomon gate which leads to the Sensoji temple and the Sensoji temple pagoda. We snap several photos and even attempt several jumping pictures.

Finally we head over to the last attraction for the day, the Tokyo Skytree. After making our way up 350 meters via elevator, we arrive at a 360 degree view of Tokyo city. The views are amazing but night views are truly majestic as the whole city comes to life and lights up. Here you can truly take in how expansive Tokyo city is. Sadly, we still aren’t able to catch a view of Mount Fuji.

After leaving the Skytree, we have worked up quite an appetite. We quickly find Shinjuku Gyoen ramen ouka which offers veggie ramen and Halal Ramen. The ramen is flavorful, spicy and very satisfying. Mine comes with a creamy tofu paste and a fire roasted rice cake. Sanchit gets ramen that is slightly closer to the traditional ramen; his ramen comprises of fish broth, chicken, and soba noodles. One type of ramen that we find readily available is the Tonkotsu Ramen, which is apparently made out of pig marrow bones.

We walk back to the hotel and call it a night after having walked 10 miles!