Tag Archives: Presidential Palace

Exploring Colombia’s capital – Bogota

December 22, 2016

We start our last full day in Colombia with a graffiti tour in Bogota. Though I was aware of the popularity of street art in South America from my trip to Chile in 2014, it is not the first thing that came to mind when we arrived in Colombia. We started our graffiti tour in the La Candaleria area of Bogota with our guide J, an American born Colombian who moved to his native country due to his interest in street art. The 2-3 hour tour was great and we walked around several neighborhoods to learn about street art in Colombia, its artists and why the art has thrived in the country.

I will let pictures do the talking but here is a link (http://www.widewalls.ch/bogota-home-for-amazing-street-art/) that talks about the history of street art in Colombia and its impact on the city of Bogota.

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Graffiti 1
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Graffiti 2
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Graffiti 3
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Graffiti 4
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Graffiti 5
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Graffiti 6
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Graffiti 7
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Graffiti 8
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Graffiti 9
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Graffiti 10

After the graffiti tour, we grab lunch at a nearby Mexican “restaurant” that was recommended by our guide J. I say restaurant in quotations because this was probably the smallest restaurant we had all ever seen. The kitchen and seating area was likely 80-100 square feet and could just barely host 6 people on bar stools. The chef made fresh tacos and burritos that we thoroughly enjoyed with all the different condiments (hot sauces, chillies, etc.). After lunch, we walked over to the Monserrate cable car station. Monserrate, a mountain in Bogota stands at over 3000 meters and is visible from every corner of the city. There are many ways to reach the summit of the mountain including hiking, cable car, and train. We end up taking the cable car as hiking is not allowed and the train not in function due to the weather. The views from the top of Monserrate are breath-taking. We walk around the little town on the top of the mountain and explore the little shops selling Colombian souvenirs.

Next, we take a cab to Casa De Narnio or the Presidential Palace. We had known about the palace from watching Narcos as it was bombed during the conflict between the guerrillas, paramilitaries, and the government forces. We were a little surprised to see thousands of people in the Presidential Palace area and the areas close to it. We soon find out that this was the week of the light show, an event hosted by the Colombian government every year. While waiting for the show to start, we quickly visit the nearby Botero museum and do some more shopping. By the time we are back for the show, we notice that the plaza area is jam packed with thousands of locals. The 20-30 minute show is portrayed on the walls of the Presidential palace and other adjacent buildings. Though it was hard to follow the exact storyline of the event, the images seemed to depict the sequential evolution of Colombia over the last hundreds of years. Regardless, the show was very entertaining but what followed wasn’t. We navigate through thousands of people and have to wait almost 45 minutes before we can get an Uber back to the hotel.

We are all exhausted once we are back at the hotel. We decide to do a quick dinner at Papa Johns and call it a night.

Bogota Sign
Bogota Sign on our walk back to the hotel after dinner