Tag Archives: Coffee Liqueur

High on Colombian coffee in Bogota

December 21, 2016

We head back south to the capital and metropolitan city of Bogota. After an early morning 2 hour flight, we are welcomed by rain and cold weather in Bogota. The hustle bustle on the roads and traffic quickly remind us of India and why Bogota is one of the largest metropolitan cities in South America. We reach the hotel after spending a good hour and a half in the morning rush hour. We check into the hotel, munch on some Indian snacks (yes we had couple boxes of Thepalas), and plan for the day.

Colombia is one of the biggest exporters of coffee beans in the world, and we figured no better place to experience a coffee plantation and learn about the production process than Colombia. Rishabh is quick to make few phone calls and books a coffee tour for us at Hacienda Coloma, located in Fusagasuga. To make the most of time, we hire a car service from the hotel and venture 2 hours outside of Bogota into the countryside of Fusagasuga. The peaks and valleys of majestic mountains in Fusagasuga are a welcoming contrast to the notoriously slow traffic and beeping horns in Bogota. Once at the plantation, we are greeted by our young guide Cesar.

Though production was off the day we visited, Cesar walked us through the end-to-end process of making a perfect cup of coffee. We can quickly tell that Cesar is not only passionate about coffee but also extremely knowledgeable about it. He starts with showing us coffee plants that are grown in a green house at Hacienda Coloma. We then learn about how to identify ripe “cherries” for picking. Next, Cesar explains how the coffee bean is extracted, dried for several days, and threshed before roasting. We see all the machines that are used for husking and roasting the dried coffee beans. At this point we also learn that the roasting process only lasts a few seconds and the longer the bean is roasted, the lower the caffeine content.

Once the beans are roasted, Cesar grinds the beans and demonstrates how to brew a perfect cup of coffee. While preparing the coffee, Cesar also talks about the rum coffee liqueur that is produced by the company and well acclaimed in Europe. Once the piping-hot coffee is ready, we try some with and without the liqueur. The fresh coffee is delicious and we can’t resist but buy some for once we are back in the US. Some cool facts learned during the tour:

  • The fresh green beans have little to no taste before they are roasted
  • Roasting transforms the green beans to aromatic, flavorful, and crunchy beans that we recognize as coffee
  • Contrary to popular belief, the light roast coffee has a higher caffeine content than dark roast coffee
  • Light roast coffee tends to retain the original flavors of the beans whereas the dark roast coffee takes on more of the flavor of the roasting process
  • The difference in roasting times between a light roast and dark roast coffee is barely few seconds (7-10 extra seconds for dark roast coffee at a slightly higher temperature)

We end the tour by walking back to the gardens and learning more about the native plants in the garden. The tour is by far one of the most interesting activities of the trip and we are all happy that we could carve some time to make it happen.

We head back to Bogota after the tour, this time spending 3 hours in the Bogota traffic before finally reaching the hotel. While Suhail and I sleep during the drive back, Akshita and Rishabh chat with our driver and polish their Spanish skills. Once back in the city, we walk over to an Asian restaurant, named Wok for dinner. The restaurant is bustling with local crowds and appears to be a popular spot among the younger population of Bogota. The food is amazing and probably the best we have come across in Colombia (yes we enjoyed Asian food the most in Colombia – remember Colombian food is not very vegetarian friendly). We end the night by enjoying crepes and waffles for dessert at a nearby joint.